'Josh'

It's been a while since I had a Space Monkey. Josh is here not because of an insane request, but rather for his helpful explanations of how Copyright Law works, which he would know, considering his lengthy background in the publishing world.

 

First let me say Thanks for making a great site, and thanks for making great deck plans. i've been GMing a Star Wars campaign since 2008 and i reference your plans for my PCs. While i was on there today I noticed you added the following ship:

Magenta Palenta

and stated that you wanted to do a mid-rigger YT-1300, so you made that one. Well im not sure if youre aware but there is another mid-rigger YT-1300. It appears in the West End Games D6 Star Wars RPG book titled Galaxy Guide 06 Tramp Freighters. It's significantly different (at least externally) than the Magenta Palenta.

The ship is called the Oo-Ta Goo-Ta. Theres a whole write up on it in the book including the pilot/owner and stats. If you want I think i can email it to you. The PDF of the book is just under 7 mb and looooong out of print (published 18 years ago) so there's not really any copyright violations. Theres a bunch of other ships in there as well.

Alternatively, i could take screengrabs of the pages and send those, but the quality will degrade.

Let me know if you're interested in it.
anyways... keep up the good work.

> Well im not sure if youre aware but there is another mid-rigger YT-1300.
Thanks, but I am fully aware of the Oo-ta Goo-ta. If you pay attention the domed canopy is identical. That ship isn't the only centre-line 1300, either, there's also the Chaser, the Starbound Misfit, the Blaze of Glory and the Menagerie.

> If you want I think i can email it to you. The PDF of the book is just under 7 mb and looooong out of print (published 18 years ago) so there's not really any copyright violations.
That is not how copyright works.

Regards
Admiral


Cool. Didn't know about the others.

> That is not how copyright works.
Well... Yes and no. If a book is out of print, and no longer available for sale, there's no loss of income for the publisher. In addition West End Games lost it's Star Wars license years ago, before they went out of business the first time. Losing the license means they don't have any rights to the book anymore, and can't profit from it. And they are going out of business for a second time and made all their products free to download. Essentially no one owns the rights to the book any more.

I worked in publishing for seven years and know a bit about it.

Anyways, I look forward to your future creations. :)

> Well... Yes and no. If a book is out of print, and no longer available for sale, there's no loss of income for the publisher.
By that rationale as soon as a factory finishes it's production run of Avatar DVDs it would be legal to copy them and distribute them for free.

> In addition West End Games lost it's Star Wars license years ago, before they went out of business the first time. Losing the license means they don't have any rights to the book anymore, and can't profit from it.
No, you have misunderstood. They lost the legal right to produce works in the Star Wars franchise, they did not lose the rights to the work they had already completed.

> And they are going out of business for a second time and made all their products free to download.
What WEG chose or did not choose to make available online is their business - they have not, nor legally could, make their SWD6 material so available. Any inference that some material being free means all material is free is utterly inane. If one is given a free sample of bacon flavoured Cheez Whiz it does not follow that all Kraft Food products are free.

> Essentially no one owns the rights to the book any more.
That is simply incorrect. The copyrights are held by West End Games, the Trademarks are held by Lucasfilm.

> I worked in publishing for seven years and know a bit about it.
I dont think I've heard this argument in a long time. I ought to disregard the fact that your ideas about the law are non-sensical and obviously erroneous because you claim to have been in publishing? I would suspect it's more along the lines of you've been told you're wrong, you don't like being told you're wrong, you've come up with some garbled obfuscation and finished with a coda you're obviously under the impression will 'prove' to me that you do, in fact, know what you're talking about.

I'm pretty sure that your reaction to this will be to lose your temper, and spend some time convincing yourself that you must be right, and I am an arsehole for daring to point out that you are wrong. I can only suggest that instead of doing that, why don't you simply spend half an hour reading up on copyright law, find out that you are, in fact, completely wrong, and pat yourself on the back for learning something instead of trotting out ill-concieved versions of what you think it must be.

It'll be OK, you don't have to write back to me and tell me I'm right. You don't need to tell anyone you've been an arse. No one will know.

Well, apart from anyone who reads the Corps of Space Monkeys, of course.

Regards
Admiral